17 : Love’s Constellation


I once was the cerulean sky
On which you leaned upon
I drew on every constellation
To make your dreams come true
Now that you’re all grown up
What a brilliant star you are
You move along your own blue sky
To make your dreams come true

     every fingertip twinkle
     draws a new constellation
     of dreams in the sky
     to light up your life

Although I know you’re capable
To shuffle your way through
Any dark matter or galaxy
You should come across
Please always remember
Please don’t ever forget
I am always and forever
Here for you


Why I wrote Love’s Constellation:


When writing Becoming a Poem and reviewing Love’s Constellation, I couldn’t help but think how it could have been written with your dad in mind.

Although the inspiration for the poem came from the clear blue sky as I looked up to it one day, the color of the sky itself isn’t far from the color of your dad’s eyes. And when reading the poem again, I couldn’t help but think that it could be how he might sometimes feel now that you’re financially independent and capable of handling things on your own.

However, when I wrote the poem, I was thinking of myself and the experiences I shared with you in order to translate the emotions and thoughts as I wrote them.


How I wrote Love’s Constellation:


I once was the cerulean sky
On which you leaned upon
I drew on every constellation
To make your dreams come true
Now that you’re all grown up
What a brilliant star you are
You move along your own blue sky
To make your dreams come true

In Love’s Constellation, the word “sky” is a metaphor to describe a parent who is present and available for their child to provide not only financial support for material necessities, but also to offer love, comfort, direction, security, and companionship. The the word “dream” is meant to describe those everyday needs as well as the goals and desires a child has as they grow up, and “constellation” is a metaphor for every resource a parent draws on to meet their child’s needs, goals, aspirations and dreams.

Being the everyday parent ever since your father and I separated when you were quite young, from feeding you to clothing you, the everyday little things where needs I met with great pride and joy. As you know, without the financial support provided by your father and the full-time job I worked at, it would have been extremely challenging to do so, and it would have been impossible to afford adequate housing in the environment where we lived.


The first stanza moves very quickly from infancy to adulthood. This was meant to keep the poem brief rather than delving into all that took place throughout your teen-aged years and instead, it focuses on how you’ve grown into a very capable and self-sufficient adult.


More on how I wrote Love’s Constellation:


every fingertip twinkle
draws a new constellation
of dreams in the sky
to light up your life

This whimsical break may seem out of place, but I chose to include it because it was a constant but pleasant distraction while I wrote the poem. Much like the verses in Season’s Apart, this lyrical thought repeated itself constantly while writing Love’s Constellation.

Even though this stanza takes on a different tone, it’s in keeping with the theme of stars and dreams, and although I considered omitting it when revising the poem, I quite like the image it evokes and the amusing childlike fantasy it ignites.

Although I know you’re capable
To shuffle your way through
Any dark matter or galaxy
You should come across
Please always remember
Please don’t ever forget
I am always and forever
Here for you

Returning to realistic issues while maintaining figurative content, the poem continues with the adult stage of life into which you’ve matured and points to any difficulties you might encounter by introducing the dark matter, which I referred to in the poem Stars.

As I’ve mentioned before, a poem can take on different meaning depending on when it is read and by whom. As the writer of this poem, reading it again as I attempt to include these notes while I continue to struggle with homelessness makes it difficult for me to maintain the positive outlook I wanted to express.


It weighs on me heavily to think of the stress and embarrassment my impoverished situation has imposed on you and it saddens me tremendously to read Love’s Constellation at this time and to think of the dark matter you may sometimes be faced with, as being me. But what pains me most is that I haven’t been, and I continue to be unable to be the parent I once was, or the parent I was meant to be, due to my financial status and homelessness.


Drawing from the poem:


From the color of the sky to the tree pointing up to the moon, it was difficult to bypass this photo when sifting through to find an image for Love’s Constellation. It aptly captures the cerulean sky as mentioned in the opening of the poem, and it places emphasis on the brightest star in the sky standing solidly on its own.

I recently came across another photo that led me to debate whether to change the original selection I made. It’s one I considered including with the poem titled Stars, but I opted to include a drawing for that one. I also came across a photo of the night sky, which I attached to another poem I recently wrote. I included these two extra photos here, along with the one originally selected for Love’s Constellation.


Stars
Night Sky
Love’s Constellation

Thank you for inspiring me to create Love’s Constellation


Love’s Constellation

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