13 : Monet’s Song


Two sunsets
One translucent moon
Every color of the spectrum
Can be seen tonight
Monet’s song brushes upon
A silent horizon

Two sunsets painted in the sky
Reflections can be seen
Beyond the ocean and the mountains
A slate of thin grey cloud slips-in
A canvas laid-out in the sky
For Monet to stroke upon

The sun glows behind the mountains
And above the clouds
While every color of the spectrum
Spreads through the horizon

One translucent moon appears
While the sun prepares to sleep
The stage is set upon the sky
For a silent lullaby
Brushing away the day
Filling our nights with dreams

The moon brings with it happiness
Translucent dreams for all to see
While the sun’s color spectrum
Shines through dreams and the horizon

What a sight it was tonight
Two setting suns one moon
If only I had a paint brush
Or a camera
I could have portrayed so much more
Than simple words on paper

Nevertheless no matter what
I cannot help myself but think
How delightful it would have been
If Monet had been here tonight
To paint a masterpiece
Of this silent horizon


Why I wrote Monet’s Song:


Monet’s Song adopts a very different theme than the previous poems by introducing a famous artist, but its focus and inspiration remains the same, and it came to be very much like Sweet Love did – while watching the sunset close to the ocean.

On this specific evening though, astonished and astounded by the illusion of two setting suns, I turned to writing in order to convince myself of what I had seen. It so happened that I was reading-up on old world artists such as Van Gogh, Picasso, and Monet – the latter, which I used as a muse for this poem.

Monet’s Song is one I revised and edited frequently, even as recently as when creating Becoming a Poem. Although it might remain overwhelming and perhaps nonsensical to some, this is an essential part of the poem, being akin to the sight I witnessed that evening.

To this day, I’ve yet to ever see such a sunset appear as though a mirror had been laid down along the horizon – it was incredibly spectacular.


How I wrote Monet’s Song:


Two sunsets
One translucent moon
Every color of the spectrum
Can be seen tonight
Monet’s song brushes upon
A silent horizon


I realize how this poem could easily be chalked-up to nonsense when reading the first few lines, but it really is an actual description of what I was looking at that evening – except for Monet’s brush of course.

The poem is laid out in somewhat of a topsy-turvy fashion in the sense that the descriptions aren’t presented in the order I actually witnessed them. But there’s a reason for this. When I set out to write and describe the incredible sunset I had witnessed, I questioned myself repeatedly as to how such a sight could have occurred. I actually doubted myself and wondered if it was what I had actually seen. Then, while considering different themes to blend into the poem, I took it a step further and imagined my line of questioning as being an interrogation. This is when I chose, through my imagination, to interrogate Monet, requiring him to prove that his painting had actually come from a real sighting.


Two sunsets painted in the sky
Reflections can be seen
Beyond the ocean and the mountains
A slate of thin grey cloud slips-in
A canvas laid-out in the sky
For Monet to stroke upon


The second stanza immediately refers to a painting with the intention to lead the reader into the imaginary zone I had entered. Looking at a finished painting with two sunsets, the descriptions then go back and forth with answers Monet would have provided to the interrogator. Maintaining this as a monologue, rather than including the line of questions that filtered through my imagination, is what makes Monet’s Song a poem rather than a scripted dialogue.

The sunset, as I actually witnessed it, lasted approximately 20 minutes. A warm evening with a gentle breeze, yet higher up in the sky, as though surfing along a brisk air wave, some clouds moved at great speed. This is where I chose the word “slate” to describe cirrus clouds slicing through and in-between every other cumulus cloud. Then, in keeping with the theme, I transformed what appeared to be a steel plate into the canvas where Monet painted the scene.


The sun glows behind the mountains
And above the clouds
While every color of the spectrum
Spreads through the horizon


While maintaining the intensity of visual phrases, the next stanza slows in pace and rhythm to describe a single sun and its glow, along with the incredible colors that come with many sunsets as an attempt to return to reality – but only momentarily.


More on how I wrote Monet’s Song:


One translucent moon appears
While the sun prepares to sleep
The stage is set upon the sky
For a silent lullaby
Brushing away the day
Filling our nights with dreams


When I looked away from the setting sun and higher up to the sky, it was as though a curtain of clouds opened up for the moon to appear. Early enough in the evening though, it seemed to be a whisper announcing nighttime’s arrival with its diaphanous texture painted on a sheer cloth pressed against the blue sky. This is where I segued from the Monet interrogation and slipped into a lyrical mood with the thought of a lullaby.


The moon brings with it happiness
Translucent dreams for all to see
While the sun’s color spectrum
Shines through dreams and the horizon


Continuing with a fantasized theme while trying to explain deeper thoughts, I linked the moon and sun to emotions and dreams to imply the continuity of both these celestial bodies, how imperative they are to our survival, and how they both can inspire the imagination.


What a sight it was tonight
Two setting suns one moon
If only I had a paint brush
Or a camera
I could have portrayed so much more
Than simple words on paper


Again, attempting to get back to reality to explain what I had witnessed – which I’ve yet to do in the poem or these notes – I intentionally repeated the sight of the two setting suns and the moon in preparation for closing while gently hinting at Monet with the mention of a paintbrush.


Nevertheless no matter what
I cannot help myself but think
How delightful it would have been
If Monet had been here tonight
To paint a masterpiece
Of this silent horizon


Monet’s Song is another example of how things unravel when I allow my imagination to take the lead without restraints or fears of being analyzed or judged for thinking of things the way I do and expressing them how I choose to.

Obviously, I don’t always let myself think along the lines of what I like to call my imagination station, but it’s a wonderful way to consider situations, experiences, or the simple sight of sunsets. I really enjoy having the ability to do so and I’m glad to share with you one of the many things I looked forward to sharing with you as you grew into a young adult.


Drawing from the poem:


When attempting to express the multitudinous reflections that inspired the poem, the drawing took on many shades and outlines.


The image I drew includes mountainous curves that weren’t part of the actual landscape, and the charcoal colors certainly don’t honor the incredible spectrum of colors I witnessed that evening. However, I did attempt to recreate the unbelievable sight by drawing the setting sun in the center of the image where the mountains dip. I then included the reflection I had witnessed just above it with a few light clouds separating the two, and the darker slate that sliced through in the center of the reflected sun.


Cropping the drawing to its focal point offers somewhat of a clearer representation of what I actually saw. The reflection was more visible than the actual setting sun, so in the drawing, I downplayed the setting sun. Here it’s cradled in the dip of the mountains, and the reflection is emphasized above it.


When I thought I had completed the drawing, I set it aside and after returning to it a few times, I chose to add the continuity of the actual sun’s shape below the mountain line and into the ocean to emphasize the focal point of the image.


As for the moon, when trying to replicate its translucency, it became hardly discernible on the top right corner of the image. The only adjustment I made when including the drawing to this poem was to add a white graphic circle on top of the drawing to highlight the moon’s translucent glow.


Thank you for inspiring me to create Monet’s Song


Monet’s Song

To contribute towards these and future pages by Cadence Beret, please forward this website to a friend or support the author directly by donating $22 towards Becoming a Poem : 22 for you.

C$22.00

Copyright © 2020 Cadence Beret / Cadent Words – all rights reserved.